NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

Photo by Sharefaith on Pexels.comBy: Hannah Avery At this point the craze surrounding NFTs is far from breaking news. NFTs (“non-fungible tokens”) have been created for everything from the “Disaster Girl” meme to the world’s first tweet. They have been the subject of numerous articles, publications, and blogs, including this blog by the Washington Journal of Law, Technology, and the Arts’ Associate Editor-in-Chief Joanna Mirsch, discussing video game-related NFTs. Despite NFTs’ widespread popularity, early “NFT craze” trends seemed at odds with established American intellectual property rights, with many works being minted as NFTs without the consent of the original creator. At the very least, ownership of NFTs was widely regarded as independent of ownership of the underlying intellectual property rights. But… what if they weren’t? While the sale of an NFT by itself does not automatically confer the…

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

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NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

Photo by Sharefaith on Pexels.comBy: Hannah Avery At this point the craze surrounding NFTs is far from breaking news. NFTs (“non-fungible tokens”) have been created for everything from the “Disaster Girl” meme to the world’s first tweet. They have been the subject of numerous articles, publications, and blogs, including this blog by the Washington Journal of Law, Technology, and the Arts’ Associate Editor-in-Chief Joanna Mirsch, discussing video game-related NFTs. Despite NFTs’ widespread popularity, early “NFT craze” trends seemed at odds with established American intellectual property rights, with many works being minted as NFTs without the consent of the original creator. At the very least, ownership of NFTs was widely regarded as independent of ownership of the underlying intellectual property rights. But… what if they weren’t? While the sale of an NFT by itself does not automatically confer the…

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

Photo by Sharefaith on Pexels.comBy: Hannah Avery At this point the craze surrounding NFTs is far from breaking news. NFTs (“non-fungible tokens”) have been created for everything from the “Disaster Girl” meme to the world’s first tweet. They have been the subject of numerous articles, publications, and blogs, including this blog by the Washington Journal of Law, Technology, and the Arts’ Associate Editor-in-Chief Joanna Mirsch, discussing video game-related NFTs. Despite NFTs’ widespread popularity, early “NFT craze” trends seemed at odds with established American intellectual property rights, with many works being minted as NFTs without the consent of the original creator. At the very least, ownership of NFTs was widely regarded as independent of ownership of the underlying intellectual property rights. But… what if they weren’t? While the sale of an NFT by itself does not automatically confer the…

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

Photo by Sharefaith on Pexels.comBy: Hannah Avery At this point the craze surrounding NFTs is far from breaking news. NFTs (“non-fungible tokens”) have been created for everything from the “Disaster Girl” meme to the world’s first tweet. They have been the subject of numerous articles, publications, and blogs, including this blog by the Washington Journal of Law, Technology, and the Arts’ Associate Editor-in-Chief Joanna Mirsch, discussing video game-related NFTs. Despite NFTs’ widespread popularity, early “NFT craze” trends seemed at odds with established American intellectual property rights, with many works being minted as NFTs without the consent of the original creator. At the very least, ownership of NFTs was widely regarded as independent of ownership of the underlying intellectual property rights. But… what if they weren’t? While the sale of an NFT by itself does not automatically confer the…

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

Photo by Sharefaith on Pexels.comBy: Hannah Avery At this point the craze surrounding NFTs is far from breaking news. NFTs (“non-fungible tokens”) have been created for everything from the “Disaster Girl” meme to the world’s first tweet. They have been the subject of numerous articles, publications, and blogs, including this blog by the Washington Journal of Law, Technology, and the Arts’ Associate Editor-in-Chief Joanna Mirsch, discussing video game-related NFTs. Despite NFTs’ widespread popularity, early “NFT craze” trends seemed at odds with established American intellectual property rights, with many works being minted as NFTs without the consent of the original creator. At the very least, ownership of NFTs was widely regarded as independent of ownership of the underlying intellectual property rights. But… what if they weren’t? While the sale of an NFT by itself does not automatically confer the…

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

Photo by Sharefaith on Pexels.comBy: Hannah Avery At this point the craze surrounding NFTs is far from breaking news. NFTs (“non-fungible tokens”) have been created for everything from the “Disaster Girl” meme to the world’s first tweet. They have been the subject of numerous articles, publications, and blogs, including this blog by the Washington Journal of Law, Technology, and the Arts’ Associate Editor-in-Chief Joanna Mirsch, discussing video game-related NFTs. Despite NFTs’ widespread popularity, early “NFT craze” trends seemed at odds with established American intellectual property rights, with many works being minted as NFTs without the consent of the original creator. At the very least, ownership of NFTs was widely regarded as independent of ownership of the underlying intellectual property rights. But… what if they weren’t? While the sale of an NFT by itself does not automatically confer the…

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

Photo by Sharefaith on Pexels.comBy: Hannah Avery At this point the craze surrounding NFTs is far from breaking news. NFTs (“non-fungible tokens”) have been created for everything from the “Disaster Girl” meme to the world’s first tweet. They have been the subject of numerous articles, publications, and blogs, including this blog by the Washington Journal of Law, Technology, and the Arts’ Associate Editor-in-Chief Joanna Mirsch, discussing video game-related NFTs. Despite NFTs’ widespread popularity, early “NFT craze” trends seemed at odds with established American intellectual property rights, with many works being minted as NFTs without the consent of the original creator. At the very least, ownership of NFTs was widely regarded as independent of ownership of the underlying intellectual property rights. But… what if they weren’t? While the sale of an NFT by itself does not automatically confer the…

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

NFTs: Coming Soon to a Patent Portfolio Near You?

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?

By Rachel Sachs, Jacob S. Sherkow, Lisa Larrimore Ouellette, and Nicholson PriceThe FDA has now authorized three vaccines and several treatments (including both monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule drugs) for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. But the initial evidence supporting these products’ introduction into the market did not include information about how they might work together. Nevertheless, information about mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies would be highly valuable not only to physicians and their patients, who must already make decisions about what treatment options to pursue under conditions of uncertainty (if the treatments are available), but also for policymakers, who want to know what products to prioritize for investment. Why is it so difficult to obtain this information? How can policymakers encourage its development? What, if anything, is known about mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?A growing body of…

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?

read this article

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?

By Rachel Sachs, Jacob S. Sherkow, Lisa Larrimore Ouellette, and Nicholson PriceThe FDA has now authorized three vaccines and several treatments (including both monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule drugs) for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. But the initial evidence supporting these products’ introduction into the market did not include information about how they might work together. Nevertheless, information about mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies would be highly valuable not only to physicians and their patients, who must already make decisions about what treatment options to pursue under conditions of uncertainty (if the treatments are available), but also for policymakers, who want to know what products to prioritize for investment. Why is it so difficult to obtain this information? How can policymakers encourage its development? What, if anything, is known about mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?A growing body of…

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?

By Rachel Sachs, Jacob S. Sherkow, Lisa Larrimore Ouellette, and Nicholson PriceThe FDA has now authorized three vaccines and several treatments (including both monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule drugs) for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. But the initial evidence supporting these products’ introduction into the market did not include information about how they might work together. Nevertheless, information about mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies would be highly valuable not only to physicians and their patients, who must already make decisions about what treatment options to pursue under conditions of uncertainty (if the treatments are available), but also for policymakers, who want to know what products to prioritize for investment. Why is it so difficult to obtain this information? How can policymakers encourage its development? What, if anything, is known about mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?A growing body of…

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?

What are the challenges in developing information around mixing-and-matching COVID-19 vaccines and therapies?